Travertine Tiles: Suitable For Walls And Floors


Travertine Tiles: Suitable For Walls And Floors – Travertine tile is a durable and attractive natural stone in a class by itself. Famous structures like the Roman Coliseum stand as a tribute to the long-lasting nature of travertine as a building material. There are many installers and DIYers today who have used travertine tile as both flooring and as wall tile who will also sing its praises as a practical and uniquely decorative addition to their interiors and exteriors.

Travertine tiles are used as floor tiles in both residential and commercial settings, as well as a decorative option for wall cladding and backsplash for the kitchen. Travertine tile has both indoor and outdoor uses, being a durable stone, and can be both functional and aesthetically striking. But what are some of the defining characteristics of travertine which sets it apart from other natural stone flooring and tile options?

Origins of travertine

Travertine is related to marble, actually falling somewhere between marble and limestone in terms of its development over thousands of years. Travertine is formed by subterranean springs, underground rivers, and other water sources. These water sources carry mineral elements such as calcium carbonate that build up over long periods of time in the same way stalactites and stalagmites in caves are formed. The resultant stone is a smooth and very hard substance further characterized by its porous surface. These pores are the result of gases escaping as the travertine is formed.

By the time it is quarried, travertine is naturally beautiful – a smooth, dense stone that exhibits a notable creamy color that evokes a certain old-world refinement. Commonly found in Italy and Turkey, travertine remains to be a popular import for construction products all over the world, including North America.

Travertine tile has been used and relied upon as tile for thousands of years, holding a place in the development of civilization from the Ancient Greeks, to the Roman Empire, and onto today’s modern age in equal measure.

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